• Oilfield News

    Three Workers Injured In Explosion At Oilfield Site In Southeast Wyoming

    Three workers suffered severe burns Thursday night in multiple explosions and a fire at an oil and gas site in southeast Wyoming. 

    Firefighters work the scene of an explosion at an oilfield compressor station in southeast WyomingThe workers sustained severe burns when an oilfield compressor station exploded west of Carpenter, according to Laramie County Fire District No. 4. One was airlifted to Western States Burn Center in Greeley, Colorado, said Laramie County Fire District No. 4 Fire Chief Scott Maddison. The two others were taken by ambulance to Cheyenne Regional Medical Center and then transported to Greeley. 

    "Those guys have a long road ahead," Maddison said Friday. 

    As of Friday afternoon, the workers were in stable condition and able to speak to their families.

    Maddison received a call to respond to the incident at 7:28 p.m. Thursday. The one witness on the scene was an employee who did not sustain injuries. He heard a "pop, pop" and went to shut off the gas.

    "When he turned around, he heard another explosion and it was like a huge fire ball," Maddison said. The fire chief was informed the fire was likely caused by a natural gas leak.

    READ MORE AT ROUGHNECK CITY NEWS ⇨

    Husky Energy Confirms 370 Job Cuts

    About 370 jobs have been cut at Husky Energy Inc. this year with most of the reductions coming in a major round of layoffs in October, CEO Rob Peabody revealed on a conference call Monday to discuss the company's guidance for 2020 and 2021.

    Husky Energy Announces LayoffsThe Calgary-based company had refused previously to say how many workers were affected by job cuts designed to better align its workforce with lower capital spending plans going forward.

    "What we're seeing is that (the reductions) will generate forward savings of about $70 million ... per year," said Peabody, adding the company will take a charge against earnings of $70 million in the fourth quarter to account for the cuts.

    "We're going to continue those efforts to capitalize on the fact we've created a more focused and a simpler company."

    In a regulatory filing earlier this year, Husky said it had 5,157 permanent employees at the end of 2018, little changed from the numbers at the end of 2016 and 2017.

    Capital spending for 2020 and 2021 is being cut by $500 million compared with guidance released last spring due to what Husky called changing market conditions.

    The budget for 2020 is to fall by about $100 million to between $3.2 billion and $3.4 billion, while the following year it will drop by an additional $400 million.

    READ MORE AT ROUGHNECK CITY NEWS ⇨

    Pumpco Services In Odessa Lays Off 112 Workers Due To Declining Rig Activity

    About 112 workers at Pumpco Energy Services in Odessa were laid off Nov. 25, according to a bulletin released Monday from the Texas Workforce Commission.

    A drilling rig works near the southern edge of the famous Permian Basin region of TexasThe advisory, which also showed 85 layoffs from National Oilwell Varco in Harris County, comes after several weeks of declining rig activity in the Permian Basin, according to reports from Baker-Hughes.

    Founded in 1982, Pumpco Energy Services specializes in pressure pumping for the fracking and completion end of the oil business, and the company was among the first to unbundle proppant and logistics as part of their business strategy.

    The company has been a wholly-owned subsidiary of Superior Energy Services of Houston since that company’s merger with Complete Energy Services in 2012.

    Source: Go San Angelo

    READ MORE AT ROUGHNECK CITY NEWS ⇨

    Halliburton Closes El Reno Oklahoma Facility-Over 800 Jobs Lost

    The oilfield company, Halliburton, told the City of El Reno it is closing its facility there and more than 800 workers will be permanently laid off.

    Halliburton Closes El Reno Oklahoma FacilityThe company asked El Reno police officers to watch the entrances Monday as workers left for the last time.

    The mass lay-off was announced just weeks before Christmas.

    “I think the people of El Reno are strong," said El Reno's Mayor Matt White. "I think they are resilient to this deal. Of course, we feel for those 808 people who have lost their jobs around Christmas time, it’s just terrible."

    Not all of the 808 workers live in the city limits, but White says losing them will hurt local businesses.

    “It is absolutely going to affect our community," White said. "It’s going to affect our restaurants, it’s going to affect our small businesses here in our community. At lunchtime those guys are full, the hotels are full with Halliburton trucks. It’s going to affect us."

    READ MORE AT ROUGHNECK CITY NEWS ⇨

    Grand Jury Indicts Oilfield Company For Felonies After Workers Say They Were Injured By Chemical Release

    A grand jury in Anchorage on Tuesday indicted Baker Hughes oilfield service companies and a Baker Hughes manager on several counts of assault after five workers with a construction crew said they were injured in a chemical release during an incident that is alleged to have taken place in Kenai in 2014.

    Grand jury indicts GE s Baker Hughes for exposing workers to toxic chemicalsThe 25 felony counts in the indictment include 10 counts of first-degree assault. The companies face up to $2.5 million in fines for the most serious charges if convicted, the Alaska Department of Law said in a statement on Wednesday.

    John Clyde Willis, a manager for Baker Hughes, faces up to 20 years in prison and up to a $250,000 fine for the most serious charges if convicted, the statement said.

    In 2014, during the construction of a new chemical transfer facility, the workers allegedly were repeatedly exposed to toxic chemical releases from the existing chemical transfer facility, the statement said, citing the indictment.

    The indictment also claims that Houston, Texas-based Baker Hughes, along with Baker Petrolite, Baker Hughes Oilfield Services, and Willis, “failed to provide safety information regarding the chemicals used on site and failed to respond to repeated complaints by workers about the chemical exposures until May 8, 2014, when several workers were sent to the hospital because of a large exposure event.”

    READ MORE AT ROUGHNECK CITY NEWS ⇨

  • Three Workers Injured In Explosion At Oilfield Site In Southeast Wyoming

    Three workers suffered severe burns Thursday night in multiple explosions and a fire at an oil and gas site in southeast Wyoming. 

    Firefighters work the scene of an explosion at an oilfield compressor station in southeast WyomingThe workers sustained severe burns when an oilfield compressor station exploded west of Carpenter, according to Laramie County Fire District No. 4. One was airlifted to Western States Burn Center in Greeley, Colorado, said Laramie County Fire District No. 4 Fire Chief Scott Maddison. The two others were taken by ambulance to Cheyenne Regional Medical Center and then transported to Greeley. 

    "Those guys have a long road ahead," Maddison said Friday. 

    As of Friday afternoon, the workers were in stable condition and able to speak to their families.

    Maddison received a call to respond to the incident at 7:28 p.m. Thursday. The one witness on the scene was an employee who did not sustain injuries. He heard a "pop, pop" and went to shut off the gas.

    "When he turned around, he heard another explosion and it was like a huge fire ball," Maddison said. The fire chief was informed the fire was likely caused by a natural gas leak.

    READ MORE AT ROUGHNECK CITY NEWS ⇨

    Husky Energy Confirms 370 Job Cuts

    About 370 jobs have been cut at Husky Energy Inc. this year with most of the reductions coming in a major round of layoffs in October, CEO Rob Peabody revealed on a conference call Monday to discuss the company's guidance for 2020 and 2021.

    Husky Energy Announces LayoffsThe Calgary-based company had refused previously to say how many workers were affected by job cuts designed to better align its workforce with lower capital spending plans going forward.

    "What we're seeing is that (the reductions) will generate forward savings of about $70 million ... per year," said Peabody, adding the company will take a charge against earnings of $70 million in the fourth quarter to account for the cuts.

    "We're going to continue those efforts to capitalize on the fact we've created a more focused and a simpler company."

    In a regulatory filing earlier this year, Husky said it had 5,157 permanent employees at the end of 2018, little changed from the numbers at the end of 2016 and 2017.

    Capital spending for 2020 and 2021 is being cut by $500 million compared with guidance released last spring due to what Husky called changing market conditions.

    The budget for 2020 is to fall by about $100 million to between $3.2 billion and $3.4 billion, while the following year it will drop by an additional $400 million.

    READ MORE AT ROUGHNECK CITY NEWS ⇨

    Pumpco Services In Odessa Lays Off 112 Workers Due To Declining Rig Activity

    About 112 workers at Pumpco Energy Services in Odessa were laid off Nov. 25, according to a bulletin released Monday from the Texas Workforce Commission.

    A drilling rig works near the southern edge of the famous Permian Basin region of TexasThe advisory, which also showed 85 layoffs from National Oilwell Varco in Harris County, comes after several weeks of declining rig activity in the Permian Basin, according to reports from Baker-Hughes.

    Founded in 1982, Pumpco Energy Services specializes in pressure pumping for the fracking and completion end of the oil business, and the company was among the first to unbundle proppant and logistics as part of their business strategy.

    The company has been a wholly-owned subsidiary of Superior Energy Services of Houston since that company’s merger with Complete Energy Services in 2012.

    Source: Go San Angelo

    READ MORE AT ROUGHNECK CITY NEWS ⇨

    Halliburton Closes El Reno Oklahoma Facility-Over 800 Jobs Lost

    The oilfield company, Halliburton, told the City of El Reno it is closing its facility there and more than 800 workers will be permanently laid off.

    Halliburton Closes El Reno Oklahoma FacilityThe company asked El Reno police officers to watch the entrances Monday as workers left for the last time.

    The mass lay-off was announced just weeks before Christmas.

    “I think the people of El Reno are strong," said El Reno's Mayor Matt White. "I think they are resilient to this deal. Of course, we feel for those 808 people who have lost their jobs around Christmas time, it’s just terrible."

    Not all of the 808 workers live in the city limits, but White says losing them will hurt local businesses.

    “It is absolutely going to affect our community," White said. "It’s going to affect our restaurants, it’s going to affect our small businesses here in our community. At lunchtime those guys are full, the hotels are full with Halliburton trucks. It’s going to affect us."

    READ MORE AT ROUGHNECK CITY NEWS ⇨

    Grand Jury Indicts Oilfield Company For Felonies After Workers Say They Were Injured By Chemical Release

    A grand jury in Anchorage on Tuesday indicted Baker Hughes oilfield service companies and a Baker Hughes manager on several counts of assault after five workers with a construction crew said they were injured in a chemical release during an incident that is alleged to have taken place in Kenai in 2014.

    Grand jury indicts GE s Baker Hughes for exposing workers to toxic chemicalsThe 25 felony counts in the indictment include 10 counts of first-degree assault. The companies face up to $2.5 million in fines for the most serious charges if convicted, the Alaska Department of Law said in a statement on Wednesday.

    John Clyde Willis, a manager for Baker Hughes, faces up to 20 years in prison and up to a $250,000 fine for the most serious charges if convicted, the statement said.

    In 2014, during the construction of a new chemical transfer facility, the workers allegedly were repeatedly exposed to toxic chemical releases from the existing chemical transfer facility, the statement said, citing the indictment.

    The indictment also claims that Houston, Texas-based Baker Hughes, along with Baker Petrolite, Baker Hughes Oilfield Services, and Willis, “failed to provide safety information regarding the chemicals used on site and failed to respond to repeated complaints by workers about the chemical exposures until May 8, 2014, when several workers were sent to the hospital because of a large exposure event.”

    READ MORE AT ROUGHNECK CITY NEWS ⇨

    Hilcorp Fined $25K After Worker Died On Alaska Oil Rig

    Hilcorp Energy Co. and one of its drilling contractors have each paid fines of $25,000 or more after a worker died at a company drilling rig on Alaska’s North Slope, officials said.

    Hilcorp Pays  25K fine for worker deathShawn Huber, 36, died at the Milne Point field in December 2018 when a 700-pound (318-kilogram) section of drilling pipe hit his head, Alaska’s Energy Desk reported Tuesday.

    An internal investigation by the companies found the rig’s operator accidentally opened a set of hydraulic jaws and dropped the 31-foot (9.45-meter) pipe section on Huber. The report submitted to Alaska workplace safety regulators said the operator was distracted while training a colleague.

    Hilcorp paid $25,000 in state-assessed penalties six months later for violating a pair of safety regulations, including one stating employers should not allow rig workers to stand or pass under “suspended loads,” and another requiring appropriate disinfectant to be used after a blood spill.

    READ MORE AT ROUGHNECK CITY NEWS ⇨

    Thousands Of Acres Sealed Off Following Blowout At Eagle Ford Shale Well

    Thousands of acres of land remain sealed off days after a blowout at a natural gas well located belonging to Devon Energy between the Eagle Ford Shale towns of Yorktown and Nordheim.

    Photo Houston ChronicleThe accident happened at a Devon Energy natural gas well near Cotton Patch Road and FM 952 in DeWitt County early Friday morning. No injuries were reported but authorities evacuated rural families living within a two-mile radius of the blowout, which sent natural gas and other pollutants spewing into the sky and surrounding countryside.

    A cause of the accident it not clear but in a statement released on Tuesday afternoon, Devon Energy reported that the company is working closely with local and state authorities and well-control specialists to cap the well and to minimize damages. The company is providing lodging, meals and other needs to the affected families.

    "Safety and environmental protection are our highest priorities during this process," Devon Energy spokesman John Porretto said in a statement. "A number of steps have been taken to contain any fluid runoff at the well site to protect the surrounding environment. We’ll begin assessing any necessary environmental clean-up as soon as it’s safe to do so."

    READ MORE AT ROUGHNECK CITY NEWS ⇨

    Texas Oilfield Worker Killed by Poisonous Gas; Wife Dies Checking on Him

    A 44-year-old Texas oil company worker died after being overcome by poisonous gas at a pump house, and his 37-year-old wife also was killed by the fumes when she went to check on him.

    Texas Oilfield Worker Overcome By H2SThe Ector County Sheriff’s Office says Jacob and Natalee Dean died Saturday night after inhaling hydrogen sulfide gas at an Aghorn Energy pump house in Odessa. Deputies say the company dispatched the husband to check on the facility. When he didn’t return as expected, his wife tried to reach him by phone but got no answer.

    She drove with their two children, ages 6 and 9, to the pump house and was overcome by the colorless, highly corrosive gas when she entered the building. The children were left in the car and weren’t harmed.

    GoFundMe Page

    Jacob and Natalee Dean- Source: Facebook

    READ MORE AT ROUGHNECK CITY NEWS ⇨

    Halliburton Lays off 650 Employees In Four Western States

    Houston oilfield service giant Halliburton has laid off 650 employees in four western states from New Mexico to North Dakota.

    Houston oilfield service giant Halliburton has laid off 650 employees in four western states from New Mexico to North Dakota.In a notice filed on Monday with the Colorado Department of Labor and Employment, Halliburton reported that the company laid 178 workers from its Grand Junction, Colo. office.

    Company officials attributed the layoffs to "local market conditions." The layoffs come amid a slump in crude oil prices that have resulted in less drilling and hydraulic fracturing activity.

    "Making this decision was not easy, nor taken lightly, but unfortunately it was necessary as we work to align our operations to reduced customer activity," the company said in a statement.

    Halliburton officials confirmed that the Grand Junction layoffs were among 650 people laid off in Colorado, New Mexico, North Dakota and Wyoming.

    The majority of those employees were given the option to relocate to other offices where more activity is anticipated, the company reported.

    READ MORE AT ROUGHNECK CITY NEWS ⇨

    Halliburton To Pay $275,000 To Settle National Origin And Religious Discrimination Suit

    Halliburton Supervisors and Co-Workers Harassed Two Muslim Employees, Federal Agency Charged

    Halliburton sued by EEOCHalliburton Energy Services, Inc. has agreed to pay $275,000 and furnish significant relief to settle a national origin and religious discrimination lawsuit brought by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), the federal agency announced today.

    The EEOC charged that Houston-based Halliburton, one of the world's largest providers of products and services to the energy industry with over 55,000 employees, subjected two oilfield workers to national origin and religious discrimination. The EEOC's suit also alleged that Halliburton unlawfully retaliated against one of the employees by firing him for reporting the mistreatment.

    According to the EEOC's suit, Hassan Snoubar, of Syrian national origin, began working for Halliburton as an operator assistant oil field worker in approximately August 2012. During his employment, Snoubar, a U.S. citizen, was subjected to taunts and name calling regarding both his national origin and his Muslim religion. According to the suit, he was frequently called derogatory names and was accused of being associated with ISIS and terrorism by supervisors and co-workers. Mir Ali, a Muslim co-worker of Indian national origin, was similarly subjected to the hostile environment. The EEOC said that the two men were made to openly suffer insults including radio broadcasts of the offensive characterizations.

    READ MORE AT ROUGHNECK CITY NEWS ⇨

    Drilling Rig Worker Alleges Oil Company's Negligence Led To Amputation Of 4 Fingers, Leg

    A worker is suing an oil company, alleging four of his fingers and his leg were amputated due to the defendants' negligence.

    Drilling Rig Worker Alleges Oil Company s Negligence Led To Amputation Of 4 Fingers  LegMiguel Saucedo filed a complaint on Aug. 22 in Harris County District Court against National Oilwell Varco LP and  Cimarx Energy Co., alleging negligence.

    According to the complaint, on Nov. 14, 2017, Saucedo was working on a drilling rig that was manufactured, designed, tested, distributed and sold by the defendants when the rig failed while under the direct control of National Oilwell Varco and Climax Energy. The plaintiff said he suffered the traumatic amputation of his right leg and four fingers.

    The plaintiff alleges the defendants failed to properly train and supervise its employees and failed to provide safe equipment.

    Saucedo seeks monetary relief of more than $1 million, trial by jury, attorney fees, court costs and all just relief. 

    READ MORE AT ROUGHNECK CITY NEWS ⇨

    Halliburton Introduces Automated Drilling Telemetry Service

     Halliburton released its QuickPulse Automated Directional Gamma Service, a new measurement while drilling (MWD) technology, that provides quick and reliable downhole information at extended depths to deliver wells faster. This capability helps operators drill longer laterals, make improved geosteering decisions and reduce well time to maximize their asset value.

    Halliburton introduces automated drilling telemetry serviceThe QuickPulse system combines directional, vibration and gamma ray sensors with a strong transmission signal that overcomes most downhole interference. The system automatically prioritizes critical vibration, tool face and downhole inclination measurements enabling rapid drilling decisions. It transmits data in intervals as fast as three seconds and full survey measurements in as little as 24 seconds.

    “As operators drill longer laterals, obtaining quality data at greater depths can be difficult because of noise and interference,” said Lamar Duhon, vice president of Sperry Drilling. “We designed the QuickPulse system with advanced sensors that detect and automatically transmit data so operators can drill faster and more accurately.”

    The system also has a small footprint for up to 70% faster rig-up time and the fully automated signal detection helps increase rig efficiency.

    READ MORE AT ROUGHNECK CITY NEWS ⇨

    U.S. Drillers Cut Oil Rigs For Record 10 Straight Months -Baker Hughes

    U.S. energy firms reduced the number of oil rigs this week and for a record 10th month in a row as producers follow through on plans to cut spending on new drilling this year.

    US Drillers Cut Oil RigsDrillers cut six oil rigs in the week to Sept. 27, bringing the total count down to 713, the lowest since May 2017, General Electric Co’s Baker Hughes energy services firm said in its closely followed report on Friday.

    In the same week a year ago, there were 863 active rigs.

    The rig count fell 29 in September, and 80 during the third quarter, the biggest quarterly decline since the first quarter of 2016.

    The oil rig count, an early indicator of future output, has declined over a record 10 months as independent exploration and production companies cut spending on new drilling as they focus more on earnings growth instead of increased output.

    That reduction in activity showed up in an energy survey released on Wednesday by the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.

    Although oil production rose, service firms reported declines in activity, a sign that operators have figured out how to pull more oil from the ground with fewer rigs. Overall, the outlook from 55 oilfield services executives surveyed was negative.

    READ MORE AT ROUGHNECK CITY NEWS ⇨

    Drones Creating Buzz In Permian Basin Oilfield

    Drones with advanced cameras are streamlining services at oil sites

    Drones in Permian Basin OilfieldImagine the detail of an entire oil site at the tip of your finger-now 3D models can bring pump jacks and rigs to your handheld device.

    That service is now available in the Permian Basin through a partnership from Thermal Cam USA and Ondaka.

    "We can map out a location like this or an oil field location or a drilling rig, we'll fly it for them and we'll take anywhere from 20,000 to 30,000 pictures of that location, and they'll stitch it or map it together into a reality program," said Peter Walper, owner of Thermal Cam USA.

    Walper and his staff operate a fleet of drones equipped with advanced cameras, and with video game like controllers in their hands. His staff and a fleet of drones with advanced cameras are streamlining a number of services at oil rig sites.

    READ MORE AT ROUGHNECK CITY NEWS ⇨

    Grand Jury Indicts Oilfield Company For Felonies After Workers Say They Were Injured By Chemical Release

    A grand jury in Anchorage on Tuesday indicted Baker Hughes oilfield service companies and a Baker Hughes manager on several counts of assault after five workers with a construction crew said they were injured in a chemical release during an incident that is alleged to have taken place in Kenai in 2014.

    Felony charges filed against Baker HughesThe 25 felony counts in the indictment include 10 counts of first-degree assault. The companies face up to $2.5 million in fines for the most serious charges if convicted, the Alaska Department of Law said in a statement on Wednesday.

    John Clyde Willis, a manager for Baker Hughes, faces up to 20 years in prison and up to a $250,000 fine for the most serious charges if convicted, the statement said.

    In 2014, during the construction of a new chemical transfer facility, the workers allegedly were repeatedly exposed to toxic chemical releases from the existing chemical transfer facility, the statement said, citing the indictment.

    The indictment also claims that Houston, Texas-based Baker Hughes, along with Baker Petrolite, Baker Hughes Oilfield Services, and Willis, “failed to provide safety information regarding the chemicals used on site and failed to respond to repeated complaints by workers about the chemical exposures until May 8, 2014, when several workers were sent to the hospital because of a large exposure event.”

    READ MORE AT ROUGHNECK CITY NEWS ⇨

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